Attitude Test

This is an attitude test, designed to tell you something about yourself. You will be presented with six situations and asked to rank the answers. None of the answers are correct. Sitting here in front of your computer you will probably decide that all of them are bad. I did. But try to imagine you are in the air, somewhat tired and in the thick of the situation.

Then rank the answers from "5" being the one of the bad answers you would most identify with, the one you would chose if you had to choose from any of the answers, to "1" being the one you least identify with, the one you definately would not choose. Then rank the answers in between. Please make sure that you do not rank any two answers in a situation at the same level. When you are done, proceed to the next situation.

After the last situation you will see some more directions.

No information is stored or transmitted from this test so you are the only one who knows your results. You can download (save) it to floppy or stick and move it to another computer which is not hooked to the Internet if you are concerned.

If you want to try it again, you need to click every button again or else the buttons which are not changed will register zero.


Situation 1.

You are on a flight to an unfamiliar, rural airport. Flight service states that VFR flight is not recommended since heavy coastal fog is forecast to move into the destination airport area about the time you expect to land. You first consider returning to your home base where visibility is still good, but decide instead to continue as planned and land safely after some problems. Why did you reach this decision?

a. You hate to admit that you cannot complete your original flight plan.

5 4 3 2 1

b. You resent the suggestion by flight service that you should change your mind.

5 4 3 2 1

c. You feel sure that things will turn out safely, and that there is no danger.

5 4 3 2 1

d. You reason that since your actions would make no real difference, you might as well continue.

5 4 3 2 1

e. You feel the need to decide quickly, so you take the simplest alternative.

5 4 3 2 1

Situation 2.

While taxiing for takeoff, you notice that your right brake pedal is softer than the left. Once airborne, you are sufficiently concerned about the problem to radio for information. Since strong winds are reported at your destination, an experienced pilot who is a passenger recommends that you abandon the flight and return to your departure airport. You choose to continue the flight and experience no further difficulties. Why did you continue?

a. You feel that suggestions made in this type of situation are usually overly cautious.

5 4 3 2 1

b. Your brakes have never failed before, so you doubt, that they will this time.

5 4 3 2 1

c. You feel that you can leave the decision to the tower at your destination.

5 4 3 2 1

d. You immediately decide that you want to continue.

5 4 3 2 1

e. You are sure that if anyone could handle the landing, you can.

5 4 3 2 1

Situation 3.

Your regular airplane has been grounded because of an airframe problem. You are scheduled in another airplane and discover it is a model you are not familiar with. After your preflight, you decide to take off on your business trip as planned. What was your reasoning?

a. You feel that a difficult situation will not arise so there is no reason not to go.

5 4 3 2 1

b. You tell yourself that if there were any danger, you would not have been offered the plane.

5 4 3 2 1

c. You are in a hurry and do not want to take the time to think of alternate choices.

5 4 3 2 1

d. You do not want to admit that you may have trouble flying an unfamiliar airplane.

5 4 3 2 1

e. You are convinced that your flight instructor was much too conservative and pessimistic when he cautioned you to be thoroughly checked out in an unfamiliar aircraft.

5 4 3 2 1

Situation 4.

You were briefed about possible icing conditions, but did not think there would be any problem since your departure airport temperature was 60 degrees F (15 degrees C). As you near you destination, you encounter freezing precipitation, which clings to your aircraft. Your passenger, who is a more experienced pilot, begins to panic. You consider turning back to the departure airport, but continue instead. Why did you not return?

a. I have made it this far. What is the use in turning back now?

5 4 3 2 1

b. The panic of the passenger makes you think it will not happen to me - I have encountered ice before and nothing happened.

5 4 3 2 1

c. Why is he panicking? I can handle this situation just like I have done before.

5 4 3 2 1

d. FAA regulations exaggerate the dangers of icing. I can handle this situation.

5 4 3 2 1

e. I have got to do something. Descend! That will make everyone realize that I am in control.

5 4 3 2 1

Situation 5.

You do not bother to check weather conditions at your destination. En route, you encounter headwinds. Your fuel supply is adequate to reach your destination, but there is almost no reserve for emergencies. You continue the flight and land with a nearly dry tank. What most influenced you to do this?

a. Being unhappy with the pressure of having to choose what to do, you make a snap decision.

5 4 3 2 1

b. You do not want your friends to hear that you had to turn back.

5 4 3 2 1

c. You feel that flight manuals always understate the safety margin in fuel tank capacity.

5 4 3 2 1

d. You believe that all things usually turn out well, and this will be no exception.

5 4 3 2 1

e. You reason that the situation has already been determined because the destination is closer than any other airport.

5 4 3 2 1

Situation 6.

You are 40 minutes late for a trip in a small airplane. Since the aircraft handled well on the previous day's flight, you decide to skip most of the preflight check. What leads you to this decision?

a. You simply take the first approach to making up time that comes to mind.

5 4 3 2 1

b. You feel that your reputation for being on time demands that you cut corners when necessary.

5 4 3 2 1

c. You believe that some of the preflight inspection is just a waste of time.

5 4 3 2 1

d. You see no reason to think that something unfortunate will happen during this flight.

5 4 3 2 1

e. If any problems develop, the responsibility would not be yours. It is the maintenance of the airplane that really makes the difference.

5 4 3 2 1

Are you done? Have you clicked on all the circular buttons. And, are sure there in each situation there are none with the same rank? If so, click on the button below to find out something about yourself.

Even though you didn't like any of the answers in the situations, in theory, the selections do tell you something about yourself. If the numbers are relatively the same, say within 10 points or so, you have a relatively even keel. If one category stands out, perhaps its time to do some thinking about it. Fly safely!

This test is part of an FAA Advisory Circular AC No: 60-22. The full circular is available from http://ntl.bts.gov/DOCS/Ac60-22.html and is also available from the AOPA at http://www.aopa.org/members/files/ac/ac60-22.txt.

Programming consultation by Digitalshade.